Make your own free website on Tripod.com
NATIVE AMERICAN HERBAL REMEDIES

Welcome To "Healing With Nature"

Home
Welcome / Intro
My Story/ My Life
My Training/Schooling
Contact Me
Family Photos
WOLVES/ My Spirit Animal
PERSONAL POEMS
MORE PERSONAL POEMS
Favorite Sayings and Poems
NATIVE AMERICAN INFO
NATIVE AMERICAN HERBAL REMEDIES
MAGIC HEALING OILS
MEMORY LOSS/ALZHEIMER'S
FRIENDLY BACTERIA/Gastrointestinal Health
LIVING WITH STRESS
MENTAL / EMOTIONAL HEALTH
OVERWEIGHT/DIETING
HERB OF THE MONTH
ALLERGIES/ What Can I Do?
WHAT'S IN YOUR SOAP AND BATH PRODUCTS ?
INFERTILITY
PREGNANCY DANGERS
NATURAL APPROACHES TO MENOPAUSE
THE "REAL" STORY OF THANKSGIVING
ORIGIN OF DISEASE AND MEDICINE/Cherokee Legend
BLACKFOOT LEGEND/Sacred Weed

RAVEN 1
ravenl.jpg
ARTIST DENTON LUND--you may not use this artist's work without his permission.

KEENCOM.
If button says send e-mail, then I am not at present taking calls
New customers get first 3 min. Free

Look at bottom of page for "The Medicine Walk"

3

"Native American Herbal Remedies"

When early settlers arrived in the United states there were more than two thousand tribes of Native Americans.
Each tribe had(and in many cases,still does),it's own system of herbal medicine that was,in many ways, far superior to the European style of health care practiced by the pioneers.

In fact,early settlers were startled to see Indians recovering from injuries that they considered fatal.
The typical Tribal Medicine Man/Woman was as well equipped as any modern day pharmacy to treat a wide range of medical needs,ranging from the common cold to childbirth.

The practicing of Medicine ways was a full time job and responsibility for the well-being and emotional balance of the Villagers/Tribe belonged to the Medicine Man/Woman.
In return for his/her services, he/she was cared for by the members of the village.
He/She always had food, shelter, his/her needs met, assistance when it was needed, and special Spirit gifts that showed the honor and respect of his/her people. This was how the Medicine Man/Woman was "paid".

Although we have incorporated many of these herbs into our herbal traditions,many have been forgotten (or) are "now" difficult to obtain.

The following list just goes to prove how sophisticated the Native American Traditional Healing/Herbal System really was.

Asthma:

Skunk Cabbage-
Used by the Winnebago and Dakota tribes to stimulate the removal of phlegm in asthma. The rootstock was official in the "U.S. Pharmacopoeia" from 1820 to 1882 when it was used in respiratory and nervous disorders and in rheumatism and dropsy.

Mullein-
The Menominees smoked the pulverized, dried root for respiratory complaints while the Forest Potawatomis, the Mohegans, and the Penobscots smoked the dried leaves to relieve asthma.
The Catawba Indians used a sweetened syrup from the boiled root, which they gave to their children for coughs,
This is still a well-known and accepted remedy used amoung Herbalist today,and it works GREAT for asthma; I know because I have used it on myself and my children.

Backache:

Arnica-
The Catawba Indians used a tea of arnica roots for treating back pains. The "Dispensary of the United States (22nd edition)" states this drug can be dangerous if taken internally and that it has caused severe and even fatal poisoning. Also used as a wash to treat sprains and bruises.
Arnica is still used by Herbalist and Homepaths today,but mostly as a rub or salve for sore muscles,sprains,etc.

Gentian-
The Catawba Indians steeped the roots in hot water and applied the hot fluid on aching backs.

Horsemint-
The Catawba tribe crushed and steeped fresh horsemint leaves in cold water and drank the infusion to allay back pain. Other tribes used horsemint for fever, inflammation, and chills.
Mint is still in wide use today by Herbalist for Stomach problems and Nerveousness.

Bronchitis:

Creosote Bush-
A tea of the leaves was used for bronchial and other respiratory problems.

Pleurisy Root-
. The Natchez drank a tea of the boiled roots as a remedy for pneumonia and was later used to promote the expulsion of phlegm

Wormwood-
The Yokia Indians of Mendocino County used a tea of the boiled leaves of a local species of wormwood to cure bronchitis.

Burns:

Yellow-Spined Thistle-
The Kiowa Indians boiled yellow-spined thistle blossoms and applied the resulting liquid to burns and skin sores.

Childbirth:

To Speed Childbirth:
Partridgeberry-
The Cherokee used a tea of the boiled leaves. Frequent doses of the tea were taken in the few weeks preceding the expected date of delivery.

Blue Cohosh-
To promote a rapid delivery, an infusion of the root in warm water was drunk as a tea for several weeks prior to the expected delivery date.
This Herb is still in wide use by Herbalist today for a wide range of female problems as well as to ease the discomfort of child-birth,and speed up delivery of the child.

To Speed Delivery of the Placenta:
American Licorice-
A tea was made from the boiled roots.
This herb is still used by Modern-day Herbalists, for a wide range of things from allergies,to stomach problems.

Broom Snakeweed-
Navajo women drank a tea of the whole plant to promote the expulsion of the placenta.

To Stop Post-Partum Hemorrhage:
Buckwheat-
Hopi women were given an infusion of the entire buckwheat plant to stop bleeding.

Black Western Chokecherry-
Arikara women were given a drink of the berry juice to stop bleeding.

Smooth Upland Sumac-
The Omahas boiled the smooth upland sumac fruits and applied the liquid as an external wash to stop bleeding.

To relieve the Pain of Childbirth:

Wild Black Cherry-
Cherokee women were given a tea of the inner bark to relieve pain in the early stages.

Cotton-
The Alabama and Koasati tribes made a tea of the roots of the plant to relieve the pains of labor.

Colds:

Boneset-
Boneset tea was one of the most frequently used home remedies during the last century,and is still used by Herbalist today.
The Menominees used it to reduce fever; the Alabamas, to relive stomachache; the Creeks, for body pain; the Iroquois and the Mohegans, for fever and colds.

Colic:

Catnip-
The Mohegans made a tea of catnip leaves for infant colic,
This remedy is still in wide use today by Herbalist for Baby's colic as well as any stomach problem, nerveousness, or sleeplesness.

Coughs:

Aspen-
The Cree Indians used an infusion of the inner bark as a remedy for coughs.

Wild Cherry-
The Flambeau Ojibwa prepared a tea of the bark of wild cherry for coughs and colds, while other tribes used a bark for diarrhea or for lung troubles.

White Pine-
The inner bark was used by Indian people as a tea for colds and coughs.

Sarsaparilla-
The Penobscots pulverized dried sarsaparilla roots and combined them with sweet flag roots in warm water and used the dark liquid as a cough remedy,
You will find,even today, many cold and cough remedies that contain Cherry,Pine,and/or Sarsaparilla.

Diabetes:

Wild Carrot-
The Mohegans steeped the blossoms of this wild species in warm water when they were in full bloom and took the drink for diabetes.
Of-course,the Native Americans never had Diabetes,until they started eating more and more of the White man's food. Now Diabetes is a very big problem amoung Native Americans.

Devil's Club-
The Indians of British Columbia utilized a tea of the root bark to offset the effects of diabetes.

The Plains Indians and Indians of the Southwest used the Prickly Pear Cactus,ground-up or pulverized,and drunk or eaten atleast once a day.

Diarrhea:

Blackcherry-
A tea of blackberry roots was the most frequently used remedy for diarrhea among Indians of northern California.

Wild Black Cherry.
The Mohegans allowed the ripe wild black cherry to ferment naturally in a jar about one year then they drank the juice to cure dysentery.

Dogwood-
The Menominees boiled the inner bark of the dogwood and passed the warm solution into the rectum with a rectal syringe made from the bladder of a small mammal and the hollow bone of a bird.

Geranium-
Chippewa and Ottawa tribes boiled the entire geranium plant and drank the tea for diarrhea.

White Oak-
Iroquois and Penobscots boiled the bark of the white oak and drank the liquid for bleeding piles and diarrhea.
Herbalist today use this in the control of pain and inflamation.

Black Raspberry-
The Pawnee, Omaha, and Dakota tribes boiled the root bark of black raspberry for dysentery.

Star Grass-
Catawbas drank a tea of star grass leaves for dysentery.

Digestive Disorders:

Dandelion-
A tea of the roots was drunk for heartburn by the Pillager Ojibwas. Mohegans drank a tea of the leaves for a tonic.
This herb/ flower is still in wide use by all Herbalist world-wide; it is excellant for Liver, Kidney problems,and as a over-all tonic.

Yellow Root-
A tea from the root was used by the Catawbas and the Cherokee as a stomach ache remedy.

Sources: Millspaugh, Charles F. American Medicinal Plants. NY: Dover Publications, 1974.

Mooney, James. Myths of the Cherokee and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees. Nashville TN: Charles and Randy Elders, Publishers, 1982.

Weiner, Michael. Earth Medicine Earth Food. NY: Fawcett Columbine, 1980

Copyright 1996 The Cherokee Cultural Society of Houston

FOR MORE NATIVE AMERICAN REMEDIES YOU CAN GO TO: http://herbsforhealth.about.com/cs/amerindianherbs/

Wrap

3

Look at bottom of page for "The Medicine Walk"

KEENCOM.
If button says send e-mail, then I am not at present taking calls
New customers get first 3 min. Free

BLACKFOOT LEGEND/Sacred Weed

WOMAN BE WISE/NATURAL SOAPS & BATH PRODUCTS

THE WAKAN CIRCLE--We are the "Old Ways"...Native American Spirituality; with love and respect--Learning to walk and teach "THE GOOD RED ROAD"

Kirby Satler - Ha Nis Krah
Ha Nis Krah
Kirby Satler
Buy Native American Art Art Prints At AllPosters.com

ORIGIN OF DISEASE AND MEDICINE/Cherokee Legend

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HOLIDAY PETITION

"The International Indian Treaty Council" An organization of Indigenous Peoples working for the Sovereignty and Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples and the recognition and protection of Indigenous Rights, Traditional Cultures and Sacred Lands.

AUTISM AND CHILDHOOD VACCINATIONS/THE LINK BETWEEN THEM

WORKING WITH ANIMAL SPIRITS----LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR SPIRIT ANIMAL

"The Medicine Walk"

Adapted from The Findhorn Book of Connecting with Nature, by John R. Stowe (Findhorn Books, 2003).

One of the oldest ways that human beings have sought Insight and self-awareness is by turning to the Living World,(Nature).

This is a practise, well-known, and accepted by all Indigenous Peoples, although different Tribes and Peoples have different Ways/Traditions of connecting with Nature.

The Medicine Walk is a simple technique to help you do the same.

Traditionally, the Medicine Walk might last a full day or longer, and could include fasting from food in order to increase personal clarity.

But you can learn the process in a much shorter time--even under an hour--and get satisfying results.
And you can always consider doing a more extensive version in the future.

1. Place. For your medicine walk, go to a Natural area that feels Strongly Inviting.
Praying and/or Meditating about this ahead of time, will help you know where to go.
Let Spirit, Creator, guide you.
It’s better to be away from human activity as much as possible, but if that isn’t possible, do what you can.

Before you begin,(the Walk), take some time to get centered and aligned, both inside yourself, and with your surroundings.
Focus your intention by following your breath until you feel quiet and ready.
Tune in to the "Energy" of the place and ask it--verbally or silently--if it would be willing to help you.
The positive feeling you get in response will be your sign to continue.
If you have any doubt about the response,or feel uneasy for any reason, choose another place.

2. Intention. The most important part of your Medicine Walk is the clarity of your intention.
To set your intention clearly, think of a question around which you’d like insight.
IT could relate to any area of your life.
The more specific you make your question, the clearer the answer you’ll get.

When you’ve chosen your question, turn your attention back to the Living Environment around you.
Either aloud or silently, ask this place and the Creatures within it, to help you gain insight around your question.
Say the question aloud, at least once, to help yourself be as clear as possible.

3. Listen. When you feel ready, start to walk. Take all the time you like.
Keeping silent will help you to maintain your focus on the question.

As you walk, release any expectations about what you think you should find.
Follow your impulses and let them guide you to whatever calls you.
When something attracts your attention, sit with it.
See what it has to share with you about your question.
How do you feel when you’re with it? What insights come to you?

The Medicine Walk draws on your imagination and symbolic awareness.
The answers you receive may Not come verbally or literally.
Instead, approach this communication as you might approach a dream or a painting.
Let it speak to the intuitive, nonverbal parts of your awareness.

(Example): Randy talked about the trees: “The trees all felt so self-contained. None of them seemed to have any question about whether they were doing things right or whether they had a right to be there. I realized I might try to be that way myself and just do what feels right instead of worrying what people say all the time.”

4. Gratitude. When you feel complete with your Medicine Walk, take a few moments to thank the place for the insights you’ve received.
Use a simple, symbolic gesture to communicate your gratitude,(such as leaving an offering of Cornmeal, Sweet Grass, Lavender, Tobacco, Pine, or Cedar).
This helps to complete your process and lets you return to the rest of your life with greater clarity.
Breathe consciously and take a few moments to re-center yourself before you return to normal awareness.

If you’ve received answers, write them into your journal.
If your experience was less focused, record it anyway.
In either case, allow yourself to stay open.

Sometimes, the most dramatic Insights come to people After they’ve completed their Medicine Walk,(sometimes days, weeks, or months later),--either in Dreams or in some other fashion.

3

HELP PROTECT THE WOLVES

Welcome To "Healing With Nature"

Welcome / Intro

My Story/ My Life

My Training/Schooling

Contact Me

PERSONAL POEMS

Favorite Sayings and Poems

WOLVES/ My Spirit Animal

NATIVE AMERICAN INFO

LIVING WITH STRESS

MAGIC HEALING OILS

FRIENDLY BACTERIA/Gastrointestinal Health

MENTAL / EMOTIONAL HEALTH

OVERWEIGHT/DIETING

WHAT'S IN YOUR SOAP AND BATH PRODUCTS ?

HERB OF THE MONTH

ALLERGIES/ What Can I Do?

INFERTILITY

PREGNANCY DANGERS

NATURAL APPROACHES TO MENOPAUSE

MY E-MAIL. CLICK HERE TO SEND ME A MESSAGE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A DEFAULT E-MAIL ADDRESS, (OR A HOME E-MAIL ADDRESS), SET UP, THIS LINK WILL NOT WORK. BUT, YOU CAN ALWAYS CONTACT ME THRU MY ADDRESS AT BOTTOM.

If you do not wish to e-mail me, you may contact me by writing to:

J. Nolan, Healing With Nature
1101 south 7th st.
Box 99
Conroe, Tx. 77301.

Thankyou for visiting Healing With Nature.Your comments and suggestions are always welcomed and appreciated. If there is a particular subject you would like to see me write on, please let me know.